Homepage / Michael Laczynski
Michael Laczynski

Michael Laczynski

was born in Warsaw in 1973. He was EU correspondent for the daily paper "Die Presse" in Brussels until March 2017 and is currently based at the "Presse" editorial office in Vienna, from where he reports on European topics. He studied economics and Japanology in Vienna and Tokyo, reported from Japan for "Austria Presse Agentur", co-founded the cultural magazine "Touristen" and was in charge of the Eastern European department of the daily financial paper "Wirtschaftsblatt". In 2015 he was awarded the Europa Staatspreis of the Federal Republic of Austria. His most recent book: "Fürchtet euch und folgt uns" (2017).

all events

Books

Coverabbildung von "Future's last year"

Michael Laczynski - Future's last year

How 1999 changed the world

Around the world, decisions were made in 1999 that transpired to be highly incendiary. Laczynski delivers a surprising analysis. Financial bubbles and debt crises, Wladimir Putin and Donald Trump, the rise of China and the demise of Europe, talent shows and "Game of Thrones". Smart phones and social networks, populists and self-promoters, internet billionaires and Me Incs, 9/11 and the endless wars in the Near East – many of the developments that have shaped our era of crises and conflicts have their roots in 1999. It was a time when the future seemed within reach and the hope for world peace and prosperity for all seemed justified rather than naive. "Future's last year. How 1999 changed the world" details how the carnival of optimism came to an end and the course was set for the return of a past we thought had long been overcome.

Coverabbildung von "Open your eyes and hope for the best"

Michael Laczynski - Open your eyes and hope for the best

An instruction manual for unsettled times

Economic crises, the success of populist parties, the return of nationalistic reflexes, the rapidly advancing digitalisation of everyday life and work are reason enough for pessimism. Discussions are held in an increasingly aggressive tone, blatantly displayed ignorance rules the virtual and real-world debates. It seems as if everyone has an opinion, but nobody has any idea where the socio-political journey is taking us. All the more welcome is this guide for living in such unsettled times – knowledgeable and well-founded, yet with plenty of humour and irony. This is a book that engagingly addresses the big topics of the present age: populism, fear of downward mobility and pressure to perform, increased harshness of communication, yearning for leadership, anxiety about the future.