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Gerhard Amanshauser Daniel Kehlmann (Foreword by) - It would be nice not to be a writer

Master of marvelling, failure in believing: on being an anachronistic contemporary.

“I was a master of marvelling and a failure in believing,” Amanshauser once wrote on himself. In this attitude, open-minded and extremely sceptical at the same time, he spent decades in his lookout high up on Salzburg’s Festungsberg hill. Secluded, but not isolated; withdrawn, but not indifferent. With ingenuity and acuity, a playful humour and unapologetic seriousness he defended his convictions - against all forms of dogmatism, banality and megalomania. All his books tell this story; most of all, however, do his diaries - a seleciton of them is now published for the first time. The observations and self-reflections in this book, alert, irritated, brilliant, scornful, dreamy and relentless to the point where Parkinson’s disease began its work of destruction, remind the reader how much Gerhard Amanshauser is missing in our time.

Book details

400 pages
format:140 x 220
ISBN: 9783701715947
Release date: 11.09.2012

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Author
Gerhard Amanshauser

was born in 1928 in Salzburg. He studied maths and physics in Graz and German and English language and literature in Vienna, Innsbruck and Marburg. In the 1970s he became known as the writer of books such as „Schloß mit späten Gästen" (Castle with late guests, 1975, turned into a film in 1981). From 1955 to his passing in 2006 he lived as a writer in Salzburg.

Daniel Kehlmann (Foreword by)

Press

\"As regards his will towards monomania, Gerhard Amanshauser cannot compare to his friend Thomas Bernhard. In terms of literary boldness, Thomas Bernhard cannot compare to Gerhard Amanshauser. Of all Austrian writers yet to be discovered, this cosmopolitan from Salzburg is the most important.\" Daniel Kehlmann, Falter

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